A Framework for Palliative Care


This consultation is now closed. 

***********************************************

Health Canada has initiated a public consultation to collect input and ideas for the purpose of developing a framework on palliative care. This consultation will run for three months from May to July, 2018. During this time we will engage Canadians on themes like: advance care planning, person and family-centred care, access issues, special populations, health care provider training and supports, caregiver needs, and community engagement. Please bookmark this page and join us regularly. We hope that you join the discussion here, and then take it to your circle of family and friends. Palliative care will impact all of us at some point in our lives, so let’s start the conversation now.

“Access to palliative care is an important issue for many Canadians and these consultations are an important step in helping to improve Canadians’ access to services. We look forward to hearing views from across the country to help us develop a framework for palliative care in Canada.”

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

Prior to participating in this consultation, please review the Privacy Notice for more information on your privacy rights.

Health Canada has initiated a public consultation to collect input and ideas for the purpose of developing a framework on palliative care. This consultation will run for three months from May to July, 2018. During this time we will engage Canadians on themes like: advance care planning, person and family-centred care, access issues, special populations, health care provider training and supports, caregiver needs, and community engagement. Please bookmark this page and join us regularly. We hope that you join the discussion here, and then take it to your circle of family and friends. Palliative care will impact all of us at some point in our lives, so let’s start the conversation now.

“Access to palliative care is an important issue for many Canadians and these consultations are an important step in helping to improve Canadians’ access to services. We look forward to hearing views from across the country to help us develop a framework for palliative care in Canada.”

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

Prior to participating in this consultation, please review the Privacy Notice for more information on your privacy rights.

Share your palliative care story.

What went well and what could have improved the experience?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including health care providers, people living with life-threatening illness, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.


Thank you for sharing your story, it will help to inform the development of a Framework for Palliative Care in Canada.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • I was a young caregiver for my mother who had stage 4 cancer

    by PsatCaregiver, 5 days ago

    Just over a decade ago, my 62 year old mother was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer.

    My sister and I became her primary caregivers. She was 29 and I was 30. It was hard to find emotional support because or friends were getting married or having babies and while they cared about our situation many could not relate.

    For about 6 months doctors tried to treat Mom with chemo but her cancer did not respond. My Mom’s only wish was to die at home. My sister and I along with a few aunts made her wish happen... Continue reading

  • Ken 2009

    by Samsy, 5 days ago

    I lost my husband in September of 2009.  He was diagnosed with terminal cancer in July of that year.  His health deteriorated quickly and at the age of 45 we were faced with the fact that he would not be around much longer.  By mid August he was losing his balance and was not eating well and after one final fall we agreed with the doctor to admit him to palliative care.  This was extremely scary and a harsh reality that the end was near.  The day we arrived at the hospital and the nurse that helped us was at... Continue reading

  • Caring for my Brother with Down Syndrome in his last few months of life.

    by EOL, 6 days ago

    Down Syndrome (DS) is caused by an extra copy of Chromosome 21 being partially or fully replicated in the cells of an individual. That same genetics also predisposes people with DS to early onset Alzheimer’s.

    People with DS are living longer, my brother Ken was 48 when we first noticed signs of decline. He died at 51 due to complications from Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Palliative Care came eventually, mercifully, the last three days of his life. Helping him transition as peacefully as he could. The qualified care at this stage was in stark contrast to the care he... Continue reading

  • I found meaning in the waiting

    by Maryisarat, 7 days ago

    I adored my Dad. Like many men of his generation, he worked, he came home, and expected my mom to have dinner on the table. My dad was an alcoholic. He was never drunk until I was 17. Now I understand even the years he didn't drink at all, he had struggles with relating to people and feelings.  He quit drinking when I was 17 and the dad I adored continued to grow and grow and was the best role model and beautiful person I have ever known yet. I was the first person in my family to got to... Continue reading

  • 6 weeks and she was gone!

    by DillonRN, 8 days ago

    In the fall of 2015 my mother became ill with what was believed the flu. In Cut Knife where they lived there is only a health facility with a nursing home and rotating physicians on certain days. So they had to travel 30 minutes to a facility in North Battleford for her illness. Her sodium was low and at the time they were not able to find the cause. It was corrected and while she was waiting for the respite bed in Cut Knife her care was turned over to a GP as per the hospital policy.  Within several days... Continue reading

  • Developmental Service Worker. Agency's first time working with palliative care and E.D.I.T.H

    by ambitionandinnovation, 8 days ago

    I am a Developmental Service Worker who works in the province of Ontario. I am considered an unregulated health care professional and am currently the primary care provider to the first two individuals in our agency's 30+ year history that are expected to die at home. Palliative care, RN delegation of tasks to unregulated health care professionals and E.D.I.T.H are all foreign to the agency that I work for. In fact those topics were so foreign that we were expected to provide CPR, regardless of the resident having a DRN in place, because our agency was afraid of the liability... Continue reading

  • Divine Intervention

    by joannevictoria, 8 days ago

    My Mother, in her mid-70s, had been on dialysis for end stage renal failure for almost a year. Dialysis was a very painful experience that robbed her of all quality of life. I spent a great deal of time with my Mom, as her caregiver and power of attorney. One day while just wandering around the hospital my Mom was now living in I decided to check out the Palliative Care Unit. I discovered a wonderful place and way to spend one's last days.  Shortly after that, my Mom decided to no longer take dialysis treatments as it was too painful... Continue reading

  • Moose Jaw, SK needs proper Palliative Care Faciity

    by itsme, 8 days ago

    My story is about my mom. She was diagnosed with Cancer and ended up in Palliative Care in Regina. We live in Moose Jaw (that is about an hour away with a population of about 36,000). Her two options were: First option was to stay in Moose Jaw where her family was (but she would be admitted to the hospital (or go to one of the nursing homes). None of which had any palliative care services. They called it palliative care, but I don't know how they can. It was really just a place to sit and die. The hospital here was... Continue reading

  • Treading the fine Line

    by enologist, 12 days ago

    Caring for parents and parent-in-law was not worrisome, but caring for a friend who had no family in our town was a concern.  

    I had no legal right to do anything for the friend and was aware that if I was accused of abusing my friend's trust, I could be in big trouble.

    If there were some way of protecting volunteers who do practical things for patients, it would give peace of mind.

  • Caring For My Father

    by rideforbraincancer, 13 days ago

    My father, Dave, was diagnosed with a Stage IV Glioblastoma Brain Cancer in January of 2016, after being hospitalized in early December 2015.  He underwent brain surgery and months of chemotherapy and radiation, after being initially told he would only have a short time to live.  We were initially told that with his diagnosis he would survive for approximately 60 days.  This became three months, then six months, then one year, 18 months, and then finally the two year mark.  He fought this horrendous disease for a long period of time, becoming one of the longest patients his oncologist had... Continue reading