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Discussion 1.1: Definition

6 months ago
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Early palliative care has been shown to improve quality of life, symptom management and patient satisfaction with care. However, stigma associated with the term "palliative care" may be a barrier to timely referral and could deprive patients and caregivers of the full benefits of palliative care.

We appreciate that there are many operational definitions of palliative care in use in Canada. In the environment in which you work, what is the definition of palliative care?


This consultation is now closed.


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  • Pallfan2018 over 1 year ago
    From the Alberta 2014 Framework we talk about PEOLC as both a philosophy and an approach to care that enables all individuals with a life-limiting and/or life-threatening illness to receive integrated and co-ordinated care across the continuum. This care incorporates patient and family values, preferences and goals of care, and spans the disease process from early diagnosis to end of life, including bereavement. Palliative care aims to improve the quality of life for patients and families facing the problems associated with a life-limiting illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, comprehensive interdisciplinary assessments and appropriate interventions. Throughout the continuum of PEOLC, health-care teams utilize an interdisciplinary approach to meet the individualized needs of patients, their families and/or caregivers. The interdisciplinary team addresses physical, emotional, spiritual, practical and social concerns that arise with advanced illness for individuals at all ages and developmental stages of life.We separate out end of life care as a concept. End-of-life-care is care provided to patients and their families when they are approaching a period of time closer to death, which may be exemplified by an intensification of inter-disciplinary services and assessments such as anticipatory grief support, and pain and symptom management.
  • CFHI_FCASS over 1 year ago
    CFHI uses the World Health Organization definition of palliative care, which emphasizes that palliative care is an active intervention that can be provided in conjunction with other therapies, is best provided using a team approach and provides holistic interventions that support patients to live as well as possible until they die. Further, palliative care affirms life and regards dying as a normal process and intends neither to hasten nor postpone death. Ensuring patients and families understand that palliative care is an active intervention that can be delivered at any point in the disease trajectory can help to overcome the stigma often associated with palliative care so that they can benefit from supportive interventions.
  • caretoend over 1 year ago
    Stigma associated with the term “palliative care” is a definite barrier to timely referral. Most individuals associate the word “palliative” as the time when there is no longer anything that can be done, that the care providers have given up, and that there is no hope. Even care providers do not understand that palliative care is an approach that can be provided alongside usual care. They may add to the misunderstanding of patients by saying such things to a patient as, “You are not yet palliative.” Unfortunately, in our region the median length of time of a patient on our palliative care program is just over 2 months, whereas the evidence tells us that for patients and families to experience the full benefit of palliative care, it should be provided at least 3 months prior to the time of death. For those patients whose palliative care needs can be addressed by primary care providers, research shows that in our province of British Columbia only fifty per cent of the time are patients identified who would benefit from a palliative approach to care. Of those identified, only 50% of the time do the care providers know of the benefits of a palliative approach to care. Not surprisingly, only 15% of those who would benefit received a palliative approach to care.In our program, we use the internationally accepted WHO definition of palliative care. The WHO definition focuses on improving the quality of living of patients and families facing life threatening illness by early identification and proactive care to prevent as well as relieve suffering through care that is person centered and team based in all domains of care, physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is needs based rather than prognosis based. Palliative care services include 1. Aid in decision making (advance care planning, serious illness conversations, goals of care conversations, medical orders for scope of treatment),2. Impeccable pain and symptom management, 3. Supports for patient and family. The WHO definition affirms life and regards dying as a normal process and states that palliative care intends to neither hasten or postpone death. Euthanasia and assisted suicide (now referred to as medical assistance in dying, MAiD) are now legally available with certain restrictions, but are opposite in intent to the philosophy of palliative care as defined by the WHO definition. Central to the discussion of the definition of palliative care is whether the provision of MAiD is separate from palliative care, or whether MAiD will now be considered part of palliative care. For the 99% who prefer to live well until they die, the stigma of palliative care will only be increased if palliative health care providers, palliative care units, and hospices offering palliative care are also providing medically hastened death. Palliative care providers do not abandon patients. For patients receiving a palliative approach to care who decide to receive MAiD, palliative care providers can and should provide 1. Aid in decision making, 2. Impeccable pain and symptom management, 3. Supports for patients and families, but the actual provision of MAiD should remain separate and be defined separate from palliative care.Intent is a key component of the definition of palliative care. To not increase the stigma associated with palliative care, it is important that patients and families can trust and be confident that the intent of palliative care and palliative care providers is not to hasten death, but to help them live well until they die.
  • CanadianVirtualHospice over 1 year ago
    The Canadian Virtual Hospice's (http://virtualhospice.ca) definition of palliative care, as found on the website is that: “Palliative care is a type of health care for patients and families facing life-limiting illness. Palliative care helps patients to achieve the best possible quality of life right up until the end of life. Palliative care is sometimes considered end-of-life care, with a main focus on comfort. However, it is increasingly recognized that a palliative approach, as part of health care is beneficial early on in serious and chronic illness. In Canada and around the world, quality palliative care: focuses on the concerns of patients and their families; pays close attention to physical symptoms such as pain, nausea, loss of appetite and confusion; considers the emotional and spiritual concerns of patients and families; ensures that care is respectful and supportive of patient dignity; respects the social and cultural needs of patients and families; uses a team approach that may include volunteers, social workers and spiritual leaders in addition to medical staff.” The Canadian Virtual Hospice aims to provide information for anyone along the various stages of illness. This includes information on decision making, the psychosocial impact of illness, end of life, symptoms, and grief and loss. The resources available for health care providers are vast and address patient and family needs that can arise with serious life-limiting illness. Providing relevant and useful resources for health care providers can assist them in integrating a palliative philosophy of care in to their everyday practice.
  • yinyang over 1 year ago
    Au Québec, les orientations gouvernementales ainsi que plusieurs documents de référence s'appuient sur la définition de l'OMS communément admise et adoptée par plusieurs autorités.Selon la Loi concernant les soins de fin de vie, les soins palliatifs et de fin de vie concernent les soins palliatifs offerts aux personnes en fin de vie (y compris la sédation palliative continue) et l'aide médicale à mourir (AMM).Ce libellé a été retenu puisque la définition des soins palliatifs de l'OMS spécifie :. les soins palliatifs ne visent ni à hâter ni à différer la mort
  • rhetoric_ally over 1 year ago
    The stigma around Palliative care is strong, and disheartening. Palliative services is a branch of medicine established and in place to support quality of life. Palliative services are focused on symptom management, of 'benefit to burden' and 'can' vs 'should', and are able to view the child as a whole and not the sum of their parts. They are doctors, nurses, social workers and chaplains that work alongside the medical teams to ensure all treatments and procedures benefit quality of life for the patient.
  • Heron63 over 1 year ago
    Making a distinction between "palliative" care meaning amelioration of symptoms to promote best possible quality of life - a definition very helpful for those with chronic, perhaps life limiting disease - and "end of life" care seems important when working with patients and families
  • vanderchaplain over 1 year ago
    Although formally we adopt a definition that considers Palliative Care to include care that is no longer curative in nature, in practice when discussing palliative care, it tends to be when death is considered to be rather immanent (less than 1 month). Referrals to palliative care specialists are not generally made until someone has less than 1 year at most, but more frequently are made within weeks of the end of life.
  • arcticfox over 1 year ago
    Palliative care is providing holistic, comfort focused care to someone during the last few months (up to a year) of life. This care is meant to include and support the patient's mental, emotional, physical and spiritual health, as well as the family during this time of change.
  • Robin over 1 year ago
    Although there is stigma surrounding the term "palliative care", I believe increased public awareness and education about the term would help dispel the myth that palliative care is synonymous with end-of-life care. I also find it confusing to conjoin the term palliative care with hospice care - another term often interpreted as end-of-life care. I prefer to use the term palliative approach to care. Videos and info-graphics by iPANEL are helpful for educating healthcare providers and the public about a palliative approach. Both the CHPCA and the Alberta Provincial Framework definitions below are comprehensive. I do wonder, however, if end-of-life and hospice could be removed from the terminology to lessen confusion. I see end-of-life care and bereavement care as components of palliative care. Hospice care must be defined more clearly to increase understanding of how it intersects with a palliative approach to care.
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    • acritch over 1 year ago
      I believe the language and terminology used in most 'Palliative Care' and 'End of Life' programs has it's own stigma attached to it. As professionals working within the health care systems we recognize the benefits of such programs taking a holistic approach to meeting our patients needs. It is when we use the terms 'palliative' or 'end-of-life', it can be seen through a negative lens and those using these programs may feel without hope and without control. I think going forward it is important to reframe language used and create new terminology for these programs.
  • KM_2018 over 1 year ago
    I work in a cancer centre and the term palliative in our centre, defines those patients that are no longer curative. We no longer cure or rid them of their disease, so when they become palliative, it means we are trying to control their disease, limit their symptoms, and improve their quality for the time they have left. Some of our patients have been palliative for years. We do have a palliative care "team", and usually these people get involved during the last 6-12 months of the patient's life. However, we are working on making early integration to palliative care more normal for our patients.
  • PallRNKaren over 1 year ago
    Palliative Care is pain and symptom management for any client diagnosed with a life threatening illness and provided at any time during the disease journey
  • Ette over 1 year ago
    The Palliative Care patient we admit, generally, come from home because the caregiver cannot manage anymore and is fatigued. The patient usually has less than 3 months left to live. Managing pain, and, symptoms of the illness are priority. But we also try to support the patient and family. We also receive patients from Acute Care, when Palliative status is determined.
  • Palliative Nurse 1 over 1 year ago
    We are a community hospice in West Niagara providing quality visiting support and services to individuals and caregivers with life limiting and palliative care needs. We provide enhance support and services to those in our community dealing with life limiting and progressive illness. The volunteer role is to support the client based on the assessment action plan, in providing holistic support and not health care. Health care is addressed by collaboration with the Palliative Care Team. The program includes Caregiver and Bereavement support.
  • arob over 1 year ago
    the definition can be broad however the "dying" piece has to be there
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    • hannah over 1 year ago
      Unfortunately i disagree. Life threatening is a term that better encapsulates those people who are living with an illness, condition or disease and may seem well or may recover but the unpredictability, caused by the illness, disease or condition is ever present.
    • yvrpcm over 1 year ago
      I think it is important that the "dying" piece is NOT there. PC can be appropriate to anyone at any stage of an illness and in many cases the patient would not be expected to die but has need of PC along the way.
  • Aussierules over 1 year ago
    Early palliative care may actually not be the answer such limited resources and so many meet the criteria defined by the Surprise Question and Gold Standard Framework ..people DO NOT want to be deemed palliative care although all non curative states actually meet the definition
  • SCpracLn over 1 year ago
    Quite simply my organization uses this definition: Palliative Medicine provides care, comfort and support to individuals and families who are living with or dying from an illness. Its purpose is to relieve suffering in order to improve a person’s quality of life. Palliative medicine provides medical treatments that focus on symptoms rather than curing illness.
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    • twodogs over 1 year ago
      Quality of life is front and centre in many definitions I come across - as is inclusion of the social, spiritual and cultural aspects of care.
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      • SCpracLn over 1 year ago
        They asked for the definition of my organization. For me a great deal of true palliative care involves much more than alleviating the physical pain and suffering (though of course this is imperative to deal with). The psycho-social element and indeed the spiritual (meaning, purpose, legacy, existential hope/fear) is also wrapped in that suffering piece and quality of life.
  • twodogs over 1 year ago
    A philosophy of care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying. It strives to help individuals and families to:• Address physical, psychological, social, spiritual and practical issues, and their associated expectations, needs, hopes and fears• Prepare for and manage end-of-life choices and the dying process• Cope with loss and grief• Treat all active issues• Prevent new issues from occurring• Promote opportunities for meaningful & valuable experiences, & personal and spiritual growth
  • livermore over 1 year ago
    Supportive care
  • Arizona over 1 year ago
    Palliative and End-of-Life Care (PEOLC): Palliative Care aims to improve the quality of life of patients and families facing the problems associated with a life-limiting illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, comprehensive interdisciplinary assessments, and appropriate interventions. End of Life Care is care provided to an individual and their family when they are approaching a period of time closer to death, which may be exemplified by an intensification of services and assessments.
  • melmay over 1 year ago
    The definition we use is the WHO definition...for those diagnosed with a life limiting illness. Focus on optimizing quality of life, symptom management.
  • erinmc over 1 year ago
    We use the CHPCA definition. "Hospice palliative care aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying. Hospice palliative care strives to help patients and families: address physical, psychological, social, spiritual and practical issues; cope with loss and grief during the illness and bereavement. Hospice palliative care aims to: treat all active issues; prevent new issues from occurring; promote opportunities for meaningful and valuable experiences, personal and spiritual growth, and self-actualization. Hospice palliative care is appropriate for any patient and/or family living with, or at risk of developing, a life-threatening illness due to any diagnosis, with any prognosis, regardless of age, and at any time they have unmet expectations and/or needs, and are prepared to accept care. Hospice palliative care may complement and enhance disease-modifying therapy or it may be come the total focus of care."
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    • hannah over 1 year ago
      I do not feel that hospice and palliative care are interchangeable and having both terms in the definition unfortunately increases the belief that it for the dying patient and that it is care reserved for persons who are in the last 6 months of life. Hospice care is a part of palliative care - it does not define it.
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      • Ebaker over 1 year ago
        I work as a CNS in a palliative care program that includes hospice residences. I agree that palliative care and hospice should not be used interchangeably. The public in general and our other health care partners are very confused with this language - Are we just about dying patients in the last weeks to months of their life or do we support patients further upstream with a life limiting condition who require palliative support (symptom management, ACP, clear discussions about diagnosis/prognosis/goals of care). It would be very helpful if there were common definitions used across Canada, or at least across provinces.
  • kott over 1 year ago
    care for person with terminal illness where cure is not possible. comfort and symptoms management is the goal of service as well as support to care givers and families
  • Gingerbugnp over 1 year ago
    I work in an acute care facility and so the definition of palliative care is equated with EoL care. There is very little opportunity to offer patients and families a true palliative approach when faced with a life limiting illness because the resources available in my region are only available to individuals with less than a 6 month prognosis or less than 3 months with a PPS of 30% or less. The palliative teams do not want to become mired in chronic illness management which could prolong the patients use of very scarce resources. We have no hospice available and many families are too overwhelmed by care needs to provide care at home. I find that much of my challenge when speaking to patients and families about palliative care is not always well received because many are not even aware that the illness they have is life limiting and by the time I'm speaking to them about it, they are often in those last weeks to months. A true approach based on either the WHO or CHPCA definition would be wonderful, but without the resources and early discussions with PCPs, patients and families will continue to think of palliative care as something only offered when medical care is no longer helping.
  • jcruikshank over 1 year ago
    CHPCA Defines palliative care as follows:What is Hospice Palliative Care?The following definition was taken from the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Norms of Practice following extensive national consultation.Hospice palliative care aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying.Hospice palliative care strives to help patients and families:• address physical, psychological, social, spiritual and practical issues, and their associatedexpectations, needs, hopes and fears.• prepare for and manage self-determined life closure and the dying process• Cope with loss and grief during the illness and bereavement.• Hospice palliative care aims to:• treat all active issues• prevent new issues from occurring• promote opportunities for meaningful and valuable experiences, personal and spiritual growth,and self-actualization.Hospice palliative care is appropriate for any patient and/or family living with, or at risk of developing, a life-threatening illness due to any diagnosis, with any prognosis, regardless of age, and at any time they have unmet expectations and/or needs, and are prepared to accept care.Hospice palliative care may complement and enhance disease-modifying therapy or it may become the total focus of care.Hospice palliative care is most effectively delivered by an interdisciplinary team of healthcare providers who are both knowledgeable and skilled in all aspects of the caring process related to their discipline of practice. These providers are typically trained by schools or organizations that are governed by educational standards. Once licensed, providers are accountable to standards of professional conduct that are set by licensing bodies and/or professional associations.Hospice palliative care is a set of services offered in many settings including acute care, complex continuing care, long-term care, home care, residential hospice care, shelters and prisons. The service looks different based on the disease trajectory of what the person is dying of, where the patient is being cared for, and the capacity of family and friends to help care for them.
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    • Linda Hochstetler over 1 year ago
      If the definition of palliative care includes family needs, why are so few resources placed here? How can it be that so many residential hospices have no social workers, and often only volunteer spiritual care support? And why are these positions not funded by the Ministry of Health, along with nursing and PSW support?
    • hannah over 1 year ago
      I feel that it is very unfortunate that Hospice and Palliative care are used simultaneously and this causes much of the misunderstandings, and reluctance of clients, to access early palliative care. hospice is part of palliative care but is not all palliative care. They should not be used interchangeably. This just promotes the historical understanding of palliative care for last 6 months of life
  • palliumcanada over 1 year ago
    Pallium Canada references the definition provided by the World Health Organization (WHO), which defines palliative care as: “…an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.”For Pallium, it is important that the definition of palliative care is not limited to end-of-life, or to a particular life stage/age group, and that it can be provided alongside treatments to control disease from the outset of diagnosis. In our experience, palliative care is best provided by an interprofessional team and should take a holistic approach to care; considering the physical, psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of wellness to improve or maintain quality of life. We recognize that there are varied definitions and vocabulary to define the terms but ultimately, palliative care is about better care, more efficient use of resources in the system, a better experience for the provider of care, and a better patient experience.
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    • hannah over 1 year ago
      i agree. There continue to be many references to "life Limiting" and I feel that this reinforces the idea that Palliative care is only for people who are dying. Palliative care is appropriate for people who may still recover from their disease or illness, but live with the threat that the disease may not be curable. This is the WHO approach. People need this support when faced with the threat.
  • Sunrise over 1 year ago
    We use the WHO definition of palliative care. As people who are referred are either not sure why they are referred (generally they don't get a clear explanation) or hesitant/nervous regarding it my first visit involves an explanation of what we do. I believe having death or dying in the definition is important as I don't want to become a service that avoids those conversations
  • Community Hospice Champion over 1 year ago
    The difference between standard medical care and hospice is not the difference between treating and doing nothing it is the difference in your priorities. In ordinary medicine, the goal is to extend life. Sacrifice the quality of your existence now—by performing surgery, providing chemotherapy, putting you in intensive care—for the chance of gaining time later. Hospice deploys nurses, doctors, and social workers to help people with a fatal illness have the fullest possible lives right now. That means focusing on objectives like freedom from pain and discomfort, or maintaining mental awareness for as long as possible, or getting out with family once in a while. Hospice and palliative-care specialists aren’t much concerned about whether that makes people’s lives longer or shorter. Palliative care is about having the information to make informed choices and decisions.
  • rae over 1 year ago
    Where I work more education is needed to provide continuity between units and departments. It seems as though there are different understandings of what palliative care means within the organization. I no longer work in residential care but this is one area of health care that needs to be educated so that people who would benefit from a palliative approach can be identified. In residential care settings I have worked in, the term palliative was used in reference to the last few days of life. The quality of palliative care in residential care facilities would improve if staff were educated on palliative care.
  • snicolson over 1 year ago
    I work in a Hospice in Ontario. We work with HPCO definition of Hospice/ Palliative Care.
  • Q321@# over 1 year ago
    The Alberta Provincial Framework for Palliative and End of Life Care definition best aligns with what we aim to achieve in our organization.
  • csb over 1 year ago
    Patients associate the term "palliative care" often with EoL. Palliative care teams can deal with pain, advance care discussions, and many other supportive interventions that may not be EOL. This needs to be captured in the definition given to the public. We also need to include that palliative care can be given while on treatment. In oncology, most patients do not realize this and then decline additional supportive services (like palliative home care).
  • Marvel over 1 year ago
    we are starting a new program and initiating use of the definition from A Model to Guide Hospice Palliative Careunfortunately in past we have used 3-6 months of life expectancy with a PPS of 50 or lower as a guide to providing palliative care service.
  • Aprilshowers.1 over 1 year ago
    I work as an NP in LTC and am full time in one home. There are 160 residents with varying degrees of health and illness. Their families and loved ones are also our care partners and understanding that palliative care doesn't equal death and giving up is the biggest challenge. Historically, the focus of health care visits and interventions has been to investigate and treat. Our largest sector in society is now seniors. That is a tribute to the great job we have done, but shifting the focus near the later years of life approaching and embracing the end of life is a huge shift. Understanding that palliative care is the comprehensive management of chronic conditions consistent with the wishes and values of the resident takes a long time for residents and families to fully appreciate. Choosing Wisely Canada has a wealth of credible and sensible information supporting and explaining this focus. When there is a clear understanding that palliative care is not doing nothing, but actually improving quality of life then the residents and their loved ones are much happier and feel understood and valued. There are many fears and losses associated with admission to LTC. Many of us hope we never have to make that transition. Palliative care is comfort and appropriate active treatment along side pain and symptom management. Anticipatory grieving is facilitated and the transition to End of life is much smoother when that time approaches.
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    • alliedhealthworker over 1 year ago
      I similarly work in both LTC and on a dedicated palliative care unit (both housed within one care program in one institution). Interestingly, the definitions that teams use seem to differ between the LTC units and palliative care units in our program. The palliative care units use definitions much like those already mentioned - aligned with the CHPCA definitions, using the domains of palliative care centred around the individual and their family (disease management, physical, psychological, social, spiritual, practical, loss/grief, EOL/death care). Those practicing in the LTC units seem to still regard palliative care as being equivalent to end-of-life care. Despite the fact that all of our LTC residents would benefit from earlier palliative care (related to chronic diseases/illnesses), this seems to still not be well accepted. There is still work to be done in changing perceptions and misconceptions.
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      • Linda Hochstetler over 1 year ago
        The palliative care services offered through LTCH's seems to be lagging compared to all other locations (hospitals, residential hospices, homes). Why is this optional???
  • Kacy over 1 year ago
    Stigma is a part of the problem for staff and the public. I agree education and increased public awareness will be needed. The World Health Organization definition (http://www.who.int/cancer/palliative/definition/en/) is the most widely accepted definition of palliative care in my area. While many staff claim to provide palliative care by this definition across multiple sectors including acute care, residential and home health we fall short on the early identification pierce or integrated palliative approach. This truly is a paradigm shift that requires an ongoing, systematic, collaborative, approach to “adopt, adapt and embed.”
  • abooth over 1 year ago
    The NWT uses "Palliative Approach to Care", meaning: A palliative approach to care improves the quality of life of individuals with life limitingconditions and illness and their families. It focuses on the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and by addressing physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs. It includes, but is not limited to, the care that is provided at end-of-life (the last days or weeks of a person’s life).
  • veejay over 1 year ago
    at the Scarborough and Rouge Hospital we strive to educate patients and staff around the language of the palliative care philosophy- a type of care provided and not a diagnosis. Language can be specified as pain and symptom management; comfort and quality of life discussions. At the Multi-Care Kidney Clinic our palliative care philosophy is encompassed within our Comprehensive Conservative Renal Care pathway that includes a holistic approach to managing pain and symptoms along with psycho-social, and then connecting them to palliative care teams in the community over time.
  • marie over 1 year ago
    To provide comforting care with dignity and respect which allows the person in care to live well and die peacefully.
  • cnh920 over 1 year ago
    Care that focuses on meeting a person’s and family’s full range of needs – physical, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual – at all stages of a chronic progressive illness. It reinforces the person’s autonomy and right to be actively involved in his or her own care – and strives to give individuals and families a greater sense of control and participation in their care. As the person’s illness progresses, it includesregular opportunities to review the person’s goals and plan ofcare and referrals, if required, to expert palliative care services. While palliative care can't claim to address every and all needs a person has, its anchoring point is person-centred care--entailing whatever a person determines to be relevant to their personhood in the midst of disease.
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    • NurseDar over 1 year ago
      Absolutely! Great post cnh920. There is need to constantly review, revisit and reframe what is happening as things change.
  • PalliativeMD over 1 year ago
    Most of the broadly available definitions are appropriate. The single greatest need is to avoid the substitution of "supportive" for palliative. This is simply an exercise in embracing stigma rather than having honest and frank discussions with patients.
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    • NurseDar over 1 year ago
      I agree the discussion has to be honest and frank. However, it is also important to go gently when people are devastated. A gentle "supportive" approach can sometimes help bring people around to realizing things are not going to "get better." We have but one chance to die and making that a good and positive experience for a patient and their family is of prime importance. There is much to be done to "support" people thru the journey especially those dying at home.
  • OPSWASylvia over 1 year ago
    In my work as a PSW in Community Home and Health care, the definition of palliative care is standardized with the CHPCA. It is important to be all-inclusive, while respecting an individual's autonomy, dignity, culture and right to choose, especially with assisted dying in Canada. It needs a holistic plan of person-centred care.
  • PallMedDoc over 1 year ago
    The Alberta Provincial Framework for Palliative and End of Life Care (https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/assets/info/seniors/if-sen-provincial-palliative-end-of-life-care-framework.pdf) defines it as:PEOLC is both a philosophy and an approach to care that enables all individuals with a life-limiting and/or life-threatening illness to receive integrated and co-ordinated care across the continuum. This care incorporates patient and family values, preferences and goals of care, and spans the disease process from early diagnosis to end of life, including bereavement.Palliative care aims to improve the quality of life for patients and families facing the problems associated with a life-limiting illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, comprehensive interdisciplinary assessments and appropriate interventions.There is more at the link.
  • jcruikshank over 1 year ago
    CHPCA Defines palliative care as follows:What is Hospice Palliative Care?The following definition was taken from the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Norms of Practice following extensive national consultation. Hospice palliative care aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying.Hospice palliative care strives to help patients and families:address physical, psychological, social, spiritual and practical issues, and their associated expectations, needs, hopes and fear.prepare for and manage self-determined life closure and the dying processCope with loss and grief during the illness and bereavement.Hospice palliative care aims to:treat all active issuesprevent new issues from occurringPromote opportunities for meaningful and valuable experiences, personal and spiritual growth, and self-actualization.Hospice palliative care is appropriate for any patient and/or family living with, or at risk of developing, a life-threatening illness due to any diagnosis, with any prognosis, regardless of age, and at any time they have unmet expectations and/or needs, and are prepared to accept care.Hospice palliative care may complement and enhance disease-modifying therapy or it may become the total focus of care.Hospice palliative care is most effectively delivered by an interdisciplinary team of healthcare providers who are both knowledgeable and skilled in all aspects of the caring process related to their discipline of practice. These providers are typically trained by schools or organizations that are governed by educational standards. Once licensed, providers are accountable to standards of professional conduct that are set by licensing bodies and/or professional associations.