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Canadian Pain Task Force Online Consultation

Thank you for your interest in this consultation with the Canadian Pain Task Force towards an improved approach to better understand, prevent, and manage pain in Canada. 

The online consultation is now closed, and written submissions are no longer being accepted. 

Feedback provided from the consultation will inform a report identifying best and leading practices, potential areas for improvement, and elements of an improved approach to pain management in fall 2020. 

For more information on the Task Force, please visit the following link: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/public-engagement/external-advisory-bodies/canadian-pain-task-force.html  

Keep in touch with us via email at CPTF cptfsecretariatsecretariatgtcsld@canada.ca 

Sincerely, 

Canadian Pain Task Force

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

Tell your story

Share your personal experience with pain. 

Your personal experience is important to us. We want to know about the impact of pain on your life and/or on the lives of those you care for.

  • How has pain affected your life?
  • Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing. 
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What has helped you the most?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people living with pain, health care providers, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.

All comments submitted will be reviewed prior to posting to ensure that any content that identifies a third party or involves the use of inappropriate language/behavior will be removed. Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice.

Thank you for having the courage to share your personal experience

Your responses have been received.

If you wish, you may return to the Canadian Pain Task Force consultation page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • I have Lupus

    by Reddog343, 2 months ago

    For 20 plus years I have been living with Lupus. It has affected many joints in my body. The one that never goes away is the pain in my hands.

    I have been prescribed every pain medication in the book including Fentanyl. So on top of the pain I also lived with the threat of becoming addicted. Thank goodness I was smart enough to only use Fentanyl for less than a week . T2 and T3 are becoming less and less effective.

    I have had some success with massage therapy, physio and some muscle building machines at the gym. The... Continue reading

  • I'm so tired.

    by Ashaniel, 2 months ago

    I have endometriosis. I found out about 4 years ago. I had been having extreme pain during periods on and off for years, was even taken to the ER by ambulance once because I couldn't walk due to pain and collapse at the mall (while buying advil and pads on my way home.

    Finally got an ultrasound, found out I had an 8cm cyst on my ovary, months of follow up later I had to call an ambulance because the pain was so bad, and still had not seen a specialist.

    Had emergency surgery cyst was 10 cm at that... Continue reading

  • Nobody Cares

    by bmcps, 2 months ago

    Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing.

    I was diagnosed with Central Pain Syndrome in 2005. All of my left side is constantly numb. Imagine you have hit your funny bone, but the pain never goes away. Wearing clothing feels like rubbing my self with course sand paper, so I dress in loose fitting clothing made of the softest fabric. I put off breakfast. Toast hurts. When I do eat, my left side gums feel swollen. I have to sit down to type this. Now my left leg is throbbing and my backside is burning. Typing with... Continue reading

  • The Loss of Dignity to Live Life Normally

    by Pharcus, 2 months ago

    I was diagnosed with renalcarcinoma, which is a type of kidney cancer. I was advised initially to leave it as it was a small cancer, but continued to check in to monitor its growth. Eventually, I was informed that it had grow enough that we should act. I was presented with an invasive surgery as the only option to address this, and invited to take part in a study that the surgeon was conducting. When the time came for surgery I was supposed to receive an epidural prior to surgery, but could not as they administered the blood thinner too... Continue reading

  • Pain as a call to action: from patient to health care provider

    by yanagis, 2 months ago

    As a someone in my late twenties, i've had widespread undiagnosed, non-traumatic chronic pain (only on the right side of my body) for 12 years. I would consider myself lucky, but like many of you, I saw many different physician specialists, 8 physiotherapists, a massage therapist, 2 chiropractors, 2 osteopaths, yoga teachers, counsellors, and pedorthists. In this health care journey, I share the frustration that many of you likely have of health care providers who think they can "cure" or believe the pain to be not as bad as we make it out to be. One of the challenges in... Continue reading

  • A Journey Not Sought

    by Painteacher2, 2 months ago

    My pain journey began about two decades ago with compression fractures in my spine that were not diagnosed as such for almost a year. I do not blame my doctor for assuming that it was soft tissue damage and not ordering x rays because I could bend and though I did not yet know it, have a very high tolerance for pain.

    When lots of physio did not improve my issues and things only seemed to get worse in terms of severe flare ups (10+ on a pain scale and no longer able to even lie down), everyone agreed that... Continue reading

  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    by tdykuvluanrrmetedu, 2 months ago

    Looks like no one has posted on CRPS yet so here goes.


    Also can whoever is moderating these comments get rid of the "This cure works!" and "Try this alternative health quackery!" posts please? That's just really frustrating noise.


    CRPS is basically part of your peripheral nervous system, after a severe injury, not healing correctly - it re-wires the autonomic nervous system top appear as though the injury never healed. Even if it does.


    So, e.g., you have an injury, or even a surgery, but instead of getting better as you heal, the pain gets worse. The peripheral nerve or... Continue reading

  • terrified for my child's future

    by piper13, 2 months ago

    My daughter suffered spine trauma nine years ago when she was twelve that resulted in chronic neuropathy in her feet. She was paralyzed and had to relearn how to walk and did all that with a smile on her face. The resulting Chronic pain is what has caused her to lose a normal life. Most days she can't get socks or shoes on and walking isn't easy since it hurts. She can't leave the house often (no socks/shoes) therefore her world that was so full of friends, sports, school has collapsed down into the size of my home, her social... Continue reading

  • Wouldn’t wish this on anyone

    by Tessa, 3 months ago

    I have rheumatoid arthritis, fybromyalgia, bursitis in both hips, DDD along my spine, PFS and a few oth delightful issues. My DNA suggests I don’t react to pain like most of the population so I figure what I say hurts would kill someone else. I am tired of the looks and the unbelieving sarvastic remarks if I say I can’t make it Or I can’t do it etc. My life changes from moment to moment and I do things I know I will pay for later but that’s the way things are. A small outing or visit may take me... Continue reading

  • From Healthy to Living with Pain

    by SockMonkey, 3 months ago

    In 2001, I began my trip to Hell.