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Canadian Pain Task Force Online Consultation

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to April 17, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to April 17, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

Share your personal experience with pain. 

Your personal experience is important to us. We want to know about the impact of pain on your life and/or on the lives of those you care for.

  • How has pain affected your life?
  • Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing. 
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What has helped you the most?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people living with pain, health care providers, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.

All comments submitted will be reviewed prior to posting to ensure that any content that identifies a third party or involves the use of inappropriate language/behavior will be removed. Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice.

Thank you for having the courage to share your personal experience

Your responses have been received.

If you wish, you may return to the Canadian Pain Task Force consultation page.


You need to be signed in to share your story.

  • Triple hip replacement

    by Edm62, 6 days ago

    I wish I was able to return to work.

    I underwent 6 surgeries in just over 3 months and had 3 different hip prosthesis put in, I spent a total of 35 days in hospital and another 42 days on 24/7 antibiotic IV. I now live with constant pain as the incision was continually cut larger; I believe the tendon was nearly severed and I present now with a crevasse on my thigh. I require a cane for ambulation and can no longer perform any work that requires a lot of walking or carrying anything needing 2 hands. I am... Continue reading

  • Chronic Pain is a Terminal Diagnoses

    by jennypuff, 10 days ago

    Nobody realizes how close we are to death, despite not being terminal. What they don't understand is chronic pain is terminal. It will eventually kill. It will deteriorate your mental health until you are a shell of who you used to be, and take the joy away from your life.

    We need help from our health care providers, teachers, and government. We can all be working class citizens if we are given the treatment and support that we need, but nothing is funded and nothing is working.

    I have chronic migraine. 28 days a month, at my worst. Un-medicated, 15... Continue reading

  • My Journey with Pain

    by Frida, 10 days ago

    I would like to begin by expressing my gratitude to everyone on this task force for their time, expertise and their invaluable work. Also, I would like to thank the many medical professionals who dedicate their work, and often the better part of their lives, to alleviating the suffering of those living with chronic pain. I have been trying to write this submission for several weeks. I am indecisive about which details to include and which to forego. There are many. Please consider the cumulative effect of all the details I have mentioned here and the many that still line... Continue reading

  • I wish I was terminal

    by FerretLadyC, 14 days ago

    My condition is complicated. I have a fused spine (T2-L5), scoliosis, degenerative disk disease and other issues with nerve damage. Some days I can’t lift my feet more than an inch. Some days I can walk slowly but unassisted. I wake up each day not knowing how the pain will control me.

    I had an amazing, physical career until the pain became so bad I literally could not breathe, could not move. I’ve experienced a 10 on the pain scale. My standard level now is around 5-6, thanks to a brilliant surgeon that too 2 years to get in to... Continue reading

  • My Journey

    by Pim Minkey, 15 days ago

    I have lumbar spinal stenosis. There was a chronic pain initiative by local pain management specialist at the time of my diagnosis. I took advantage of every workshop, course, exercise class, spinal epidural and support group available. I was able to lower my pain levels. I can no longer hike, but I can now walk at least an hour on a level surface without repercussions. I can do pilates with adaptations. I practised what I have been taught about chronic pain self-management, especially most importantly pacing myself. I support others with chronic pain and they support me.

  • me, just me

    by ann, 16 days ago

    I have suffered many serious physical injuries.

    The dysfunction along with pain control my life. The medical community has done me great harm from sexual abuse, harassment and bulling. My challengers are due to looking good, what does that mean? At a glance I stand tall, try to walk as normal as possible and I speak my truth. This does not make you friends when I refuse treatments that either have been tried or make no sense.

    My pain is... due to the damage in my spine from C1 down to S triggering Radiculopathy throughout my C's and lumbar, this... Continue reading

  • Atypical MS

    by J.Doe, 18 days ago

    I have used an earlier research name for my disease in order to avoid initial confusion, because many people are not aware that atypical MS, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, is not in fact the same thing as chronic fatigue syndrome. People who genuinely have correctly-diagnosed ME do not experience fatigue that is chronic - ME is a disease that does not cause chronic fatigue, and does not even necessarily cause fatigue as a symptom. It is not defined or diagnosed based on fatigue.

    ME was registered as an organic neurological disease in the WHO ICD under G.93.3 in 1969, based on... Continue reading

  • Rolfing® was the answer

    by siguy, 20 days ago

    When I was 13 and again when I was 20 I suffered life threatening injuries to my neck, upper thoracics and lumbars. Being young I recovered and was able to continue with my life. In my early thirties I started to work as a beekeeaper, soon after I developed severe lower back pain which continued on and off until I was in my early fifties.

    During that time I practiced yoga and was generally active as an organic orchardist. By the time I was in my early fifties the pain in my lower back had become chronic and was aggravated... Continue reading

  • Part of new life

    by Darka, 21 days ago

    In 2002, I had a bicycle crash, shattering my hip into a few segments and breaking my pelvis so badly that it was split in two parts a half-inch apart. A local orthopedic surgeon threw up his hands and said he could do nothing for me. The hip was a mess, but the pelvis break was just too terrible to be mended. I was wheelchair-bound. Then he recalled there was a world-class orthopedic surgeon two hours away, called him and I was sent by ambulance there where he mended me in an eight-hour surgery, using metal to keep the pelvis... Continue reading

  • Migraine Miracle

    by Wolsley, 23 days ago

    At age 4 ( the age I continue to recall this pain) I suffered very severe migrain headaches. I had fallen out of a high chair at age 2 - landing on my head. I recall at 4 and 5 years of age such severe head pain that would be made more extreme even by someones foot steps on the floor. My parent got me to a chrioporactor at 5 years of age and amazing relief was experienced almost imediatly with spinal corrective care to the nerve root areas of my cervical and upper dorsal spine. The life changing experience... Continue reading