Canadian Pain Task Force Online Consultation

Thank you for your interest in this consultation with the Canadian Pain Task Force towards an improved approach to better understand, prevent, and manage pain in Canada. 

The online consultation is now closed, and written submissions are no longer being accepted. 

Feedback provided from the consultation will inform a report identifying best and leading practices, potential areas for improvement, and elements of an improved approach to pain management in fall 2020. 

For more information on the Task Force, please visit the following link: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/public-engagement/external-advisory-bodies/canadian-pain-task-force.html  

Keep in touch with us via email at CPTF cptfsecretariatsecretariatgtcsld@canada.ca 

Sincerely, 

Canadian Pain Task Force

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

Tell your story

Share your personal experience with pain. 

Your personal experience is important to us. We want to know about the impact of pain on your life and/or on the lives of those you care for.

  • How has pain affected your life?
  • Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing. 
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What has helped you the most?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people living with pain, health care providers, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.

All comments submitted will be reviewed prior to posting to ensure that any content that identifies a third party or involves the use of inappropriate language/behavior will be removed. Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice.

Thank you for having the courage to share your personal experience

Your responses have been received.

If you wish, you may return to the Canadian Pain Task Force consultation page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

  • Ice Pick Challenge

    by grandma2, about 1 year ago

    Three years ago I was at an appointment with a Pain Specialist for a cortisone injection in my shoulder area, a procedure that I had on two previous occasions. I was asked to lay on the table on my stomach and wait for the Doctor. The procedure was started and the next thing I remember was a pain so excruciating in my chest I let out a scream. Then the right side of my body was paralyzed. When I was taken to the ER the Resident Doctor described the pain I experienced as an ice pick going thru my back... Continue reading

  • My Pain Story

    by Melb, about 1 year ago

    I had my first knee surgery in 1972, since then there has been 28 more including 2 TKRs as well as 4 disc fusions, 4 hernias, 3 sinus surgeries, 1 MOHS and a number of other surgeries over the years. I currently have 2 herniated discs, 2 aneurysms and severe arthritis to deal with. My doctor seems to think I should not be using T3 or Emtec to treat the chronic pain, I should be using Advil or other NSAIDs the majority of which make me sick to my stomach. Patient pain should not be treated with a blanket approach... Continue reading

  • Godsent

    by Lucky Larry, about 1 year ago

    Several years ago I hurt my back by trying to lift something that was too heavy. I could hardly walk and I was in great pain. I went to my doctor and he said I had two choices. I could have an operation OR I could see if a chiropractor could help me. I took several months before I could go back to work. I would drive to the doctors office and have my right leg resting on the passenger seat and when I got there I had to lay on the floor of the supply room. I could NOT... Continue reading

  • The Life I Once Know

    by MaggieMuggins67, about 1 year ago

    It was a cold day in January, when my life changed for ever. I was a medevac nurse, which transported critical, trauma, the acute care and chronic care patients. I absolutely loved my work, I cannot call it a job, it was an experience of which I was privileged by working hard. I studied and worked my way up the ladder to this wonderful opportunity to help others. Not only was I nurse but I am also a mother of two amazing adults and a wife of a husband that provided me with as much support as they knew how.

    ... Continue reading

  • When Canada's geneticists walked away from a leading cause of pain

    by EDSmom, about 1 year ago

    Hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome is one of thhe leading causes of chronic pain in children. Last year, Canadian geneticists decided they would no longer diagnose the condition and there is now no diagnostic pathway for patients. When my daughter got ill at 14 with chronic pain, loss of mobility and frequent blackouts, the diagnosis of conversion disorder was quick. This was a significant barrier to her recovery and she fell into a deep depression and left school in grade 10. After her diagnosis with hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome we finally found treatments that worked because they let us get to... Continue reading

  • Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Fibromyalgia

    by honeybearjai, about 1 year ago

    My quality of life has deteriorated greatly. Prior to becoming ill I worked full time, played volleyball 2-4 nights per week, walked/ran 5 & 10 k's, did back country hiking/backpacking, cooked and baked daily, kept a tidy, clean organized home, had a healthy and active social and family life, and could afford to do whatever I wished.

    I've been struggling financially, I've lost most of my friends, I'm in pain every day, I can no longer work (not even part time), my house is very dirty and messy (I can't physically do many household chores nor can I afford to... Continue reading

  • Lower back pain

    by Condo, about 1 year ago

    I began having severe lower back pain. Aftet waiting months to see my doctor and get an MRI i was sent to various specialists that had no answers. The best solution i was offered was a spinal fusion surgery. I found doctors in Europe using a technique called MAST (Modic Anitbitiotic Spinal Therapy) ...it eliminated and cured my lower back pain without surgery. Canadian doctors need to recognize this simple therapy. I urge anyone with severe back pain to research Modic Antibiotic therapy online and ask your doctor.

  • Chronic pain with a smile

    by knurse30, about 1 year ago

    I have always prescribed to the philosophy of suck it up and keep on moving. That was a philosophy that seemed to work until recently when I was diagnosed with central spinal stenosis in my early forties. For the past year I have struggled with numbness in my lower extremities and waves of pain in my low back ranging from burning to searing with the occasional dose of sciatica. Through all this time I have been reluctant to discuss this with my physician. As a health care professional I know first hand the stigma associated with chronic pain. Labels and... Continue reading

  • LIFE in PAIN

    by LIFEinPAIN, about 1 year ago


    Within the last few years I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia due to multiple random pain instances. I was also diagnosed with costochondritis within about a year of the first diagnosis. Living with pain that is very random/sporadic is very difficult and causes much anxiety and stress. I was forced to take a leave from work and eventually returned, but on an accommodation status which has severely impacted me financially. In my opinion, there is not enough research, education or resources available to properly diagnose or manage pain issues. Healthcare providers are too quick to diagnose, they seem to choose what's... Continue reading