Canadian Pain Task Force Online Consultation

Thank you for your interest in this consultation with the Canadian Pain Task Force towards an improved approach to better understand, prevent, and manage pain in Canada. 

The online consultation is now closed, and written submissions are no longer being accepted. 

Feedback provided from the consultation will inform a report identifying best and leading practices, potential areas for improvement, and elements of an improved approach to pain management in fall 2020. 

For more information on the Task Force, please visit the following link: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/public-engagement/external-advisory-bodies/canadian-pain-task-force.html  

Keep in touch with us via email at CPTF cptfsecretariatsecretariatgtcsld@canada.ca 

Sincerely, 

Canadian Pain Task Force

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

Tell your story

Share your personal experience with pain. 

Your personal experience is important to us. We want to know about the impact of pain on your life and/or on the lives of those you care for.

  • How has pain affected your life?
  • Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing. 
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What has helped you the most?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people living with pain, health care providers, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.

All comments submitted will be reviewed prior to posting to ensure that any content that identifies a third party or involves the use of inappropriate language/behavior will be removed. Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice.

Thank you for having the courage to share your personal experience

Your responses have been received.

If you wish, you may return to the Canadian Pain Task Force consultation page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

  • Pain-as a patient and a healthcare provider

    by twinturbokerry, about 1 year ago

    I have been living with chronic pain since 2011 following an injury secondary to another chronic medical condition. I am 35 years old, I have a 3 pieces of hardware supporting my right femur post-fracture and I stand/walk all day at work. Pain has taken over my life-I have a high pain tolerance but lack of effective treatment and compensating has increased R hip pain, lower back/knee pain, compression in spine leading to muscle tension and sciatic type L leg pain with occasional L foot numbness. It hurts to sit (and drive). Long standing depression has drastically worsened as constantly... Continue reading

  • Natural Pain Management

    by netflix, about 1 year ago

    As an OT who has worked for over 25 years in the field of helping clients manage chronic pain, I have never seen a treatment more effective than MPS (Micropoint Stimulation). You can see more about this treatment at www.dolphinmps.com.


    It is effective for both anxiety, as well as chronic pain. typically as a therapist, i will complete 2-4 sessions with a client, with usually a response noted after the first 1-2 sessions. If we see a response, client can purchase the device and treat at home.


    I found this treatment very mucy by accident. My mother had debilitating sciatic... Continue reading

  • Pain In Motion

    by Toedancer, about 1 year ago

    I had a very bad fall off stairs and went backwards, my back hit steps, then landed on basement floor on stomach, which means I did a flip in mid-air. The MRI showed 2 burst fractures in my spine. I already had 2 herniated discs, but was managing just fine. However, the fractures basically has made my life just STOP. Pain lifting legs to put pants on, pain standing too long, pain walking a quarter of a block. IOW's always Pain while in Motion. So sitting mostly, gaining weight, growing depressed. I was given pain meds, hated them all, won't... Continue reading

  • Ankylosing Spondilitis and Crohn's

    by carebear76, about 1 year ago

    Good day, I have a long history of pain...It started when I was about 28, I am now 43. I was having unbearable lower back pain, so much so that I was having my young daughter help me to do everyday functions like dressing myself and such. It took 2-3 years for a diagnosis and my family doctor had to dispute findings before finally getting somewhere. It was determined by a rheumatologist that I have Ankylosing Spondilitis. Great a diagnosis! There wasn't much they could do to help but at least I felt like someone understood for a change.

    Then... Continue reading

  • Discrimination Stigma and Abuse and Neglect

    by Christine0912, about 1 year ago

    The title describes what I have faced due to experiencing ongoing pain.

    I was doing physiotherapy, taking NSAIDS, working and raising a family but needed pain management. Part of the issue that I am sure contributed to my pain was a very heavy menstrual flow that slowly decreased my hemoglobin over months. This all went unrecognized. Muscles weakened quickly and fatigue was ever present.

    It began with arthritis and DDD in my neck. Hypermobility caused intense spasms and inflammation in my neck and shoulders and the pain was excruciating. Disks began slipping and pressing on nerves. I was permitted Tylenol... Continue reading

  • Living in pain keeping me from living *trigger warnings-suicide discussed*

    by Rubyred, about 1 year ago

    I live with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, however that title is so misleading as fatigue is only the tip of the iceberg. I live with constant pain in my joints, muscles and around my mid section that feels like barbed wire being pulled tight digging into my flesh as well as debilitating migraines that leave me fantasizing about ending my life in order to end the pain (graphic but my daily reality). Along with the pain I deal with Cognitive issues, flu like symptoms, gastrointestinal issues, and irregular heartbeat, dizziness, skin symptoms, light and sound sensitivity.

    ... Continue reading

  • Place with no Pain

    by Ginger2, about 1 year ago

    Place with No Pain!


    Hi my name is Annmarie and I live with chronic Osteo Arthritis Pain.


    I went through lots of abuse in my life and dealt with this by pouring myself into reading, writing and doing art work!

    This lead to isolation during servers Depression. The inactivity brought on obesity which added to my Osteo Arthritis Chronic Pain.

    It didn’t stop me from helping others however I really needed to help myself get out the door and be Active Physically Mentally and Spiritually!


    Learning the hard way to look after myself! Now am conscious of my diet too!

    ... Continue reading

  • My life was existence only. Pain Stole everything.

    by Painsuks, about 1 year ago

    No career. No family. No friends. No peace or comfort. No life.

  • Lack of Holistic Support from Medical System

    by Ocean, about 1 year ago

    I have been struggling with chronic pain on a daily basis for over two years and have been tossed back and forth between so many specialists that I have so many different diagnoses and no real treatment plan. I've also been told by my GP that I just have to 'live with the pain' which is beyond frustrating. I have had to go part time at work and have workplace modifications just to function. This whole journey has felt isolating, depressing and defeating. I long for a pain clinic in my community which has physio, doctors, specialists and counselors that... Continue reading

  • I am not defined by my pain

    by Crojea, about 1 year ago

    I have, from birth, had headaches and body pain every single day. I have been told by doctors that my pain tolerance is very high. What others classify as a 9, I count as a 4-5. I rarely take any pain medication. I do not want to be addicted and my body does not tolerate medicine well.

    I can't control the pain but I've learned to tolerate it. I'm 63 so I've had a lot of pain. I don't usually say anything about the pain