Canadian Pain Task Force Online Consultation

Thank you for your interest in this consultation with the Canadian Pain Task Force towards an improved approach to better understand, prevent, and manage pain in Canada. 

The online consultation is now closed, and written submissions are no longer being accepted. 

Feedback provided from the consultation will inform a report identifying best and leading practices, potential areas for improvement, and elements of an improved approach to pain management in fall 2020. 

For more information on the Task Force, please visit the following link: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/public-engagement/external-advisory-bodies/canadian-pain-task-force.html  

Keep in touch with us via email at CPTF cptfsecretariatsecretariatgtcsld@canada.ca 

Sincerely, 

Canadian Pain Task Force

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

The Canadian Pain Task Force is leading a national consultation. Our aim is to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of the millions of Canadians who live with pain.

We invite you to share your experience and ideas on this topic. Your input will shape our report to Health Canada in June 2020. At that time we will outline elements of an improved approach to pain in Canada.

This consultation will be open online from February 27 to May 29, 2020.

It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete the questionnaire, depending on how much input you would like to give. You can save your work at any point and submit your response any time before the closing date. Please note, for your input to be considered, you must click SUBMIT on the last page of the questionnaire.

We encourage you to share the questionnaire with others. Please include your family, friends and anyone else you may know who would like to improve how we address pain in Canada.

You may also wish to review the first Task Force report for background information. That report describes current strengths and weaknesses across the following themes:

We encourage you to think about any of these themes that are important to you when giving your input.

For more information about the Task Force, please visit the Canadian Pain Task Force web page: Link.

Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice. It will give you information on your privacy rights.

Tell your story

Share your personal experience with pain. 

Your personal experience is important to us. We want to know about the impact of pain on your life and/or on the lives of those you care for.

  • How has pain affected your life?
  • Please describe the pain you have experienced and/or are experiencing. 
  • What challenges have you faced?
  • What has helped you the most?

We are interested in hearing from everyone, including people living with pain, health care providers, caregivers, family and friends, and others interested in this area.

All comments submitted will be reviewed prior to posting to ensure that any content that identifies a third party or involves the use of inappropriate language/behavior will be removed. Before participating, please review the Privacy Notice.

Thank you for having the courage to share your personal experience

Your responses have been received.

If you wish, you may return to the Canadian Pain Task Force consultation page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    by Zazenwarrior, about 1 year ago

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    by Janetlynn, about 1 year ago

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  • Sex and Primal Screams!

    by LadyJane1968!, about 1 year ago

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    by ajmb, about 1 year ago

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    by CanonShooter, about 1 year ago

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    by cheeseislikelife, about 1 year ago

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    by 5825 CSL, about 1 year ago

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  • The Necessary Tools

    by lesnosing, about 1 year ago

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    by stingraybc, about 1 year ago

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